Soccer Coaching Tip – 2nd Defender

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What Everybody Ought to Know About Coaching Youth Soccer – The Top 5 Factors For Fun and Success!

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By William B

I believe there are 5 key factors that contribute to both having fun, and also being successful, when it comes to practicing and playing the game of soccer.

Make It Fun for the Kids
The first and most important factor is to make it fun for the kids. If you can make it fun, they will come to practice with enthusiasm and with a willingness to learn. That sets the stage to teach the basic fundamentals of soccer.

Basic Fundamentals
The basic fundamentals of soccer are the second most important thing. This must be done at an early age. By teaching the kids the basic fundamentals at an early age, they take that foundation with them for future learning. Like anything else, building a house, putting together a project plan for Information Technology system projects, or learning the game of soccer. A strong foundation is the key to success.

Plan Your Practice Sessions
The third factor is being prepared and having a plan for each practice session. Each practice session should focus on a particular subject. Maybe today we will learn about how to dribble the ball with the inside of each foot, by controlling the ball and keeping it close to our feet and not letting it get too far out in front of us. Control of the ball is a key factor with learning the game of soccer. You can make this teaching exercise fun by having the players dribble around objects, each other, having it be a race with control, etc. The focus though must be on keeping the ball close, using both feet, and having fun while doing these exercises. Each practice session should have a theme, or, an expected outcome of what you are looking to accomplish in that session. Other items to work on are passing, shooting, trapping, etc. Also, at a very young age such as 6 – 8, you must keep the practices short. Young players do not have the ability to stay focused for a very long period of time.
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How to Coach a Soccer Team : Change of Direction

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Coaching Soccer – Effective Use of Small Sided Games

Filed under: Game Strategy, Youth Soccer, Youth Soccer Coach by: admin
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By Nigel Reed

Small sided games are the back bone of developing fundamental concepts of the game and provide the coach and player a like a simplified “game like” environment to explore and teach the concepts. (I have covered the Basic Principles of the Game in another article)

Small Sided Games are a must for the major part of your coaching sessions. You do need to ensure that a lot of ball drills are used to ensure that players are technically able to play, and I structure my sessions such that players get a lot of touches as part of the warm up. Having technically sound players makes it far easier to introduce some of the concepts of small sided games.

However, the vast majority of learning comes from small sided games.

What is a Small Sided Game?
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Youth Soccer Drill: Cruyff Turn

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12 Tips For New Coaches in Youth Soccer in the Attack

Filed under: Youth Soccer, Youth Soccer Coach, Youth Soccer Coaching by: admin
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By Ken Long

If you spend $30 to buy a book on coaching youth soccer, it will be 200 pages of great advice that your girls cannot use. Your job as a coach is to reduce all that excellent advice into a set of rule sthat your players can remember in the middle of the game while they are running as fast as they can. This is no easy task for the inexperienced coach.

You should have your players maintain a soccer Journal and encourage them to study their notes in between practices. These offenses principles would make a nice one-page entry in their journal. These are the words that you should use in practice to make sure that they understand and apply the principles of offense.

Offensive principles for youth soccer:

When our team has the ball, your job is to:

1. Spread out and use all of the space on the field
2. Use your teammates to invincible
3. Support your fellow teammates and talk to them
4. Take the ball wide and be ready to pass
5. Carry the ball to the corner
6. Cross the ball to the center
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Youth Soccer Drill: Scissors Technique

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Becoming A Soccer Coach – Essential Advice That You Need To Know

Filed under: Youth Soccer, Youth Soccer Coach, Youth Soccer Coaching by: admin
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By C Turner

Many people harbor dreams of becoming the ultimate soccer coach. In this article, I can help your dreams come true.

Soccer (or football) is a global sport. In fact, if you didn’t know already, it’s the biggest sport in the world with fanatic followings in every country and corner of the globe.

This means that you are normally in one of two situations:

– you live in a country that is passionate about the sport and everybody loves soccer.

– you live in a country where soccer is overshadowed by other sports but is growing rapidly.

The great thing is, you can succeed as a soccer coach in both types country.
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Soccer Coaching Tip – Dribbling for Control

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Soccer Coach License – Do I Really Need One?

Filed under: Youth Soccer, Youth Soccer Coach, Youth Soccer Coaching by: admin
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By C Turner

There are many licenses now available for budding soccer coaches, but are they really necessary? In this article, I’ll give you the lowdown.

I don’t know about you but I hate exams. They are such a pain in the back side. Having to sit down in a hall and prove that I know how to coach soccer, or even worse – having to deliver a presentation to a board of examiners. Surely all this is not necessary, right?

Sadly, it is so I recommend you face the reality – here’s why.

Nobody needs a license to coach soccer (actually there is one level where you do, more on that later). You just help out some kids or young adults, assist them with drills, motivate them, make tactical changes, plan for your next game etc. Why would you need a qualification to do that? Surely, there is no replacement for experience?

Yes, experience is more important actually but it’s a “chicken and egg” situation. You need a license to get better jobs to get experience. And without experience, you cannot get the better jobs either. Here’s what you should do. Most countries have a soccer licensing body, usually the national soccer association, who offer a variety of qualifications. Just get yourself what is normally called the “Level 1” qualification. It’s real easy and a cinch compared to your high school exams. And you’ll actually learn a lot too.

Once you have your Level 1 badge, you’ll find that a lot of doors open to you. People can recognise that you are serious about coaching soccer because you went to the trouble of getting your badge. They’ll help you get the experience you need to ascend the coaching ranks and maybe one day become pro.

Oh yeah, remember how I said that you don’t need a license to coach soccer? Well, actually, the top European coaches now have to take the UEFA Pro license to keep their jobs. So, if even the pros have to take some exams, then one exam for you is not going to hurt now, is it?
Want to learn more about becoming a pro coach? Need to know what it takes to become part of the elite set? Discover what you need to know about a soccer coach license and much more and get a sneak peak look at the new soccer coaching bible at http://www.EliteSoccerCoach.com

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Youth Soccer Drills – Coaching Youth Soccer

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Youth Soccer Rules for the Beginner Coach

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By Steven R Parker

The Basic Rules

The following are some of the most commonly observed youth soccer rules, as dictated by the United States Youth Soccer Associations (USYSA) and the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). Remember that youth soccer rules can vary between leagues and age divisions, so always consult the local soccer authority for the final word on rules and regulations.

Each team is comprised of 11 players- 10 on the field and 1 in goal. According to youth soccer rules, a team is allowed a maximum of 3 substitutions during the match if it is part of an official competition. While all the players on the field must wear jerseys of the same color, the goalkeeper must wear a different colored jersey than their teammates and the referees. Most goalkeepers choose to wear a goalkeeping jersey, a pinnie or mesh training vest, or a t-shirt.
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